The Whangie, Kilpatrick Hills

This massive and unique rocky outcrop seems to appear out of nowhere on an otherwise grassy hillside. Situated at an elevation of 300m (984 ft), the 10m high rocks have a narrow passageway through the middle, formed during the Ice Age.

Technical sheet
No. 22838907
A Stirling walk posted on 09/06/22 by Gillian's Walks. Update : 14/06/22
Calculated time Calculated time: 1h40[?]
Distance Distance : 4.41km
Vertical gain Vertical gain : 155m
Vertical drop Vertical drop : 155m
Highest point Highest point : 342m
Lowest point Lowest point : 187m
Moderate Difficulty : Moderate
Back to starting point Back to starting point : Yes
Walking Walking
Location Location : Stirling
Starting point Starting point : N 55.997315° / W 4.389468°
Download : -
The Whangie

Description

(D/A) From Queen's View car park, cross a stile over the wall.

(1) Follow the path South West then North West to a second stile. At the fork in the path here keep right (West) to skirt around the bottom of the crags.

(2) At a path junction 850m along keep right (lowest path)

(3) After 640m you will arrive at The Whangie.

After exploring The Whangie, leave from the South side of The Whangie, where there is a footpath leading off to the left (East).

(4) There is a fork 150m along. Turning right (South East) takes you up to the trig point on Auchineden Hill (357m high). If you aren't going to Auchineden Hill, continue ahead (North East) at the fork.

Keep left at any forks as you continue for 540m to a path junction beneath some crags(2)

From here retrace your steps back to Queen's View car park (D/A)

Waypoints :
D/A : km 0 - alt. 187m - Queen's View car park, A809
1 : km 0.63 - alt. 261m - Stile and fork - keep right
2 : km 1.49 - alt. 313m - Path junction - take lowest path
3 : km 2.11 - alt. 314m - The Whangie
4 : km 2.41 - alt. 338m - Fork - optional climb to top of Auchineden Hill
D/A : km 4.41 - alt. 187m - Queen's View car park, A809

Useful Information

For more information and a walk review visit Gillian's Walks

Terrain - the paths are often very boggy and will also feel exposed in poor weather conditions. Steep crags close to the path.

Visorando and this author cannot be held responsible in the case of accidents or problems occuring on this walk.

During the walk or to do/see around

  • The Whangie - a strange geological phenomenon formed during the ice age. Popular with rock climbers.
  • Views to Loch Lomond, the Campsies and the Scottish Highlands
  • Optional short de-tour to the summit of Auchineden Hill (357m)
  • Kilpatrick Hills - a range of hills in central Scotland, stretching from Dumbarton in the west to Strathblane in the east and Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park to the north.

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The GPS track and description are the property of the author.