Dumgoyne, Campsies

The prominent peak of Dumgoyne dominates the skyline from the villages below. It may be a small hill at 427m (1401ft), but it certainly packs a punch and makes for a very rewarding climb!

Technical sheet
No. 26216373
A Stirling walk posted on 30/08/22 by Gillian's Walks. Update : 31/08/22
Calculated time Calculated time: 2h15[?]
Distance Distance : 4.20 km
Vertical gain Vertical gain : 360 m
Vertical drop Vertical drop : 360 m
Highest point Highest point : 392 m
Lowest point Lowest point : 32 m
Moderate Difficulty : Moderate
Back to starting point Back to starting point : Yes
Walking Walking
Location Location : Stirling
Starting point Starting point : N 56.014895° / W 4.364593°
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Dumgoyne Hill

Description

(D/A) From the north end of the lay-by, cross the A81 onto a single track road at the other side, passing some houses on your right.

Continue gently uphill for approx 800m. Along the way you'll pass a house on your left, cross a bridge over a burn and then pass a third house.

(1) Just beyond the third house you will reach a wide track which you cross straight over (East) onto an open grassy area.

(2) Follow a grassy path leading towards some trees at the foot of the mountain and after crossing over two stiles you are ready to start your ascent at a particularly boggy area!

Take care at this point: there are two possible routes up. The most tempting one is to make a beeline for the summit on an obvious track heading east. It is however extremely steep so my suggested route is detailed below.

Follow the footpath which bears left (North East) from just beyond the stiles (2). Note that it is very easy to miss (see image on Gillian's Walks for an illustration).

(3) Walk uphill for a distance of 400m then keep right (South East) at a fork at 280m elevation.

At 310m elevation the path swings round to the right (South) just below some crags.

(4) Traverse the hillside for 80m then turn left (North East) at a fork to start climbing to the summit (5).

From the summit, retrace your steps back to the lay-by (D/A)

Waypoints :
D/A : km 0 - alt. 32 m - Lay-by off A81 next to Glengoyne Distillery
1 : km 0.84 - alt. 107 m - Cross over wide track
2 : km 1.16 - alt. 143 m - Stiles
3 : km 1.56 - alt. 278 m - Fork
4 : km 1.8 - alt. 320 m - Fork
5 : km 2.1 - alt. 392 m - Dumgoyne summit
D/A : km 4.2 - alt. 32 m - Lay-by off A81 next to Glengoyne Distillery

Useful Information

For more information and a walk review, visit Gillian's Walks

Transport

  • Car parking available in lay-by off A81 immediately after passing Glengoyne Distillery
  • Bus stop on A81 outside Glengoyne Distillery

Terrain
Surfaced roads and steep, grassy mountain paths which can be boggy. Two stiles. Exposed in places with craggy areas. navigation skills are essential. It is advised to carry a map and compass and know how to use them.

Visorando and this author cannot be held responsible in the case of accidents or problems occuring on this walk.

During the walk or to do/see around

  • Campsie Fells - this walk can be extended to include an ascent of Earl's Seat
  • Glengoyne Distillery
  • Village of Killearn near by
  • Village of Strathblane near by
  • Mugdock Country Park near by

Other walks in the area

Organisation / Walking Club / Mountain guide
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distance 10.79 km Vertical gain +577 m Vertical drop -569 m Durée 4h45 Moderate Moderate
Starting point Starting point in Stirling

At a height of 578 m (1896 ft), Earl’s Seat is the highest of the Campsie Fells. Relatively unspectacular-looking, it fades into the background behind it’s impressive neighbour Dumgoyne Hill. That said, the summit is a great vantage point with panoramic views across to Loch Lomond and the Scottish Highlands on one side, and the city of Glasgow and beyond on the other.

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Starting point Starting point in Stirling

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distance 24.44 km Vertical gain +527 m Vertical drop -550 m Durée 8h30 Difficult Difficult
Starting point Starting point in Stirling

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Organisation / Walking Club / Mountain guide
distance 30.75 km Vertical gain +488 m Vertical drop -517 m Durée 10h10 Moderate Moderate
Starting point Starting point in East Dunbartonshire

The West Highland Way is the most established of Scotland’s long distance walking routes. This is the first of a five stage route, staying at prebooked accomodation along the way.

Organisation / Walking Club / Mountain guide
distance 149.63 km Vertical gain +2,960 m Vertical drop -2,983 m Durée 5 days Difficult Difficult
Starting point Starting point in East Dunbartonshire

The West Highland Way is the most established of Scotland’s long distance walking routes. Officially opened on 6th October 1980, it celebrated its 40th anniversary in 2020. The WHW stretches 96 miles (154 Km) from Milngavie to Fort William, taking in a huge variety of scenery along the way, from countryside parks to loch-shores and open moorlands to steep mountains. This is a five stage route, staying at prebooked accomodation along the way.

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The GPS track and description are the property of the author.

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