Codnor, Pentrich and South Wingfield Revolution walk

This walk visits sites associated with the story of Pentrich and South Wingfield Revolution. After visiting the Butterley Works, the rebels continued their march through the night of the 9th June 1817 towards Nottingham. At Codnor they sought refreshment and shelter from the rain in public houses and continued their search for weapons, being joined by those from Ripley, Heage, Swanwick and Alfreton. This is Walk 9 of the Pentrich and South Wingfield Revolution group.

Technical sheet
No. 21895035
A Codnor walk posted on 13/05/22 by Pentrich Revolution Group. Update : 17/05/22
Calculated time Calculated time: 1h20[?]
Distance Distance : 4.26km
Vertical gain Vertical gain : 45m
Vertical drop Vertical drop : 50m
Highest point Highest point : 139m
Lowest point Lowest point : 105m
Easy Difficulty : Easy
Back to starting point Back to starting point : Yes
Walking Walking
Location Location : Codnor
Starting point Starting point : N 53.042865° / W 1.37478°
Download : -
Home farm Woodland Views over Erewash Codnor Castle

Description

(D/A) From the Poet and Castle Public House, (A) turn right out of the car park, right (South) in front of the clock tower, right (North-North-East) onto High Street, the A610. Walk down Glasshouse Hill to the site of Codnor Fish bar. Continue down Glasshouse Hill (B), until you reach Ashmere Care Home.

(1) Turn right (East) on the footpath to reach Alfreton Road. Turn right (South) again up the hill. Continue up Alfreton Road until you see a public footpath on the left. Passing this footpath, continue until you reach a second footpath, marked Codnor Castle. Take this footpath, a tarmac road between houses, until you reach a stile.

Cross the stile into a field, continue down the side (East) of the field, with the hedge on your left. When the footpath splits at woodland follow the green lane on the left side of the wood.

(2) The pathway comes to another stile. Cross this, keep straight ahead (East) crossing one field and into the next. 50 yards down the hedge on your left is a stile. Cross the stile into the road and turn slightly right (East). As you walk down the road enjoy the views of the Erewash Valley.

The road turns to the right. Immediately after this turning there is a stile in the hedge on the right at a footpath sign. Follow this into the field with the remains of Codnor Castle (C) ahead of you. Walk towards the remains of the castle (D), turn left on the path before reaching the old walls and on to the drive to Castle Farm.

(3) Turn left out of the farm entrance, and rejoin the road. Facing you is a gate in the hedge. Go through the gate continue straight (West) ahead across the field. With farm buildings and a hedge to your right continue to the stile, cross the stile and follow the path, directly across a track, which is marked with red/orange posts that will take you across the Ormonde Fields (E) golf course.

The path across the golf course will take you around the edge of the greens-for your safety, go behind the Club House, until you reach a road (Castle Drive).

(4) Cross the road and follow the signs to the right (West-North-West), going around the edge of the green with trees on your right. You will reach a gate, ahead of you, at the bottom of the hill. Here you leave the golf course, walk across the field to the right until you reach a stile in the hedge.

Walk left up the lane, passing Codnor's former Miners Welfare. This becomes Goose Lane (F). This road will meet the A610. `

(5) Turn right (North-West) and walk down the hill (A610) until you reach 20b on the opposite side of the road. Go back up the hill, staying on the same side to reach the present French Horn pub and the Poet and Castle Public House (G), the starting point of the walk.(D/A)

Waypoints :
D/A : km 0 - alt. 127m - Poet and Castle Public House
1 : km 0.49 - alt. 122m - Ashmere Care Home
2 : km 1.6 - alt. 129m - Wood
3 : km 2.57 - alt. 130m - Castle Farm drive
4 : km 3.17 - alt. 120m - Castle Drive road
5 : km 4 - alt. 121m - A610
D/A : km 4.26 - alt. 127m - Poet and Castle Public House

Useful Information

Care is needed when crossing roads. Undulating, footpaths, stiles, lanes, and roads.
Park: Opposite the Poet and Castle Public house.
Start: The Market Place in Codnor. OS ref. Explorer 269-420 492.

More information at https://pentrichrevolution.org.uk/groupf...

Visorando and this author cannot be held responsible in the case of accidents or problems occuring on this walk.

During the walk or to do/see around

(A) Opposite this and slightly to further on your right in 1817, this was the site of the Glasshouse public house, kept by Joseph Thorp. Revolutionaries arrived demanding beer and other refreshments. It was reported that when the bill of 28 shillings was given to Jeremiah Brandreth, he told the landlord that he would be paid when they had overthrown the government. “If I offered you a Bank of England note it will be of no use now.” John Bacon made a speech to the marchers saying that the Government had robbed the people and they must fight or starve. Isaac Ludlam stood at the door with a pike to stop any deserters slipping away.

(B) On your left you will pass Home Farm, one of the older buildings in Codnor this would have been here when the men passed this way.

(C) Codnor Castle, a Scheduled Ancient Monument, was the seat of the De Grey family, important supporters of kings from Richard I, John and Edward I, to Henry VII, and fighting at important battles like Crecy and Agincourt and in the Wars of the Roses. The Castle was in ruins by the 18th century, its stone used to build neighboring Castle Farm. In June 2007, Channel 4's Time Team programme carried out an archaeological dig here.

(D) On summer weekends you may be able to get refreshments at Castle Farm and ask about a guided tour of the Castle remains.

(E) In 1817 Ormonde Fields house was owned by the Marquis of Ormonde, an Irish Peer and politician, who sat for Kilkenny County in the Irish House of Commons and lived an extravagant life style. He owned over 1000 acres around Codnor and Heanor.

(F) The site of the original French Horn was on the opposite side of the road, further down Nottingham Road, just below Goose Lane. There is a bungalow there now which has the French Horn emblem above the door. Revolutionaries came here and again demanded ale from the landlord, Stephen Tissington. Tissington said that he drew five gallons of beer, but the bill of £1 3s 4d was left unpaid. He reported the men were boisterous and fired out the windows, saying they needed to test their guns as they were wet with rain. A farm fork was taken, as was one of the customers. On the site of the present French Horn was Hall’s Farm. Here the rebels took some pitchforks from the farmer, Mr Stirland, and two or three men were forced to join the march.

10. The Poet and Castle was called the New Inn when the revolutionaries called there on the night of 9th June 1817. Here they also demanded refreshment from the landlord, Thomas Clarke. He drew two gallons and the unpaid bill was 4s 6d. The rebels also took a gun and several forks from outbuildings. After getting refreshment, weapons and men at Codnor, the rebels now continued their march through the night towards Langley Mill and Eastwood.

Other walks in the area

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This walk visits sites associated with the story of Pentrich and South Wingfield Revolution. At the beginning of the nineteenth century, Ripley was a smaller town than Pentrich, but it played an important part in the Pentrich Revolution. There was much support here for reform and many joined the rebels’ march. This is Walk 8 of the Pentrich and South Wingfield Revolution group.

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