Swanwick, Pentrich and South Wingfield Revolution walk

This walk visits sites associated with the story of Pentrich and South Wingfield Revolution where many joined the rising from the Swanwick area, where discontent among miners and framework knitters had already been expressed in Luddite activity and an active Hampden Club. The walk will also pass the interesting industrial heritage of the area. This is Walk 7 of the Pentrich and South Wingfield Revolution group.

Technical sheet
No. 21808167
A Swanwick walk posted on 10/05/22 by Pentrich Revolution Group. Update : 10/05/22
Calculated time Calculated time: 2h05[?]
Distance Distance : 6.46km
Vertical gain Vertical gain : 76m
Vertical drop Vertical drop : 76m
Highest point Highest point : 140m
Lowest point Lowest point : 107m
Easy Difficulty : Easy
Back to starting point Back to starting point : Yes
Walking Walking
Location Location : Swanwick
Starting point Starting point : N 53.074985° / W 1.397938°
Download : -
Hayes Conference Centre lake Butterley Gatehouse Hayes Conference Centre Toll Bar cottage

Description

(D/A) From St Andrew's Church in Swanwick village (A), walk East-South-East down the road, The Green, (B6016) following the signs to the Conference Centre. Take the first turning to the right (South-East) onto Hayes Lane and walk on crossing the road to go up to the entrance to the Hayes Conference Centre.

(1) Here turn left (East) at the footpath sign to follow the track up the hill. Passing Hilltop Mink Farm on the right, continue until the track turns sharply.

(2) Go straight ahead (South-East) over the stile to follow the sign to Golden Valley. Follow the footpath straight ahead down the hillside. Go under the railway line (B). After 100 yards, right under the 2nd underpass, walk on and cross the railway line. Immediately after the railway line take the left (South) fork up through the trees.

Past the Brittain Pit turn right at the junction of paths (taking Amber Valley Route 4). After a few yards turn left to go down the hill to cross two stiles in the valley. BEWARE of the barbed wire on the stiles. Enter the field (C) and follow the path up left (South) along the hedge to reach the Coach Road at the former Toll Bar cottages.

(3) Turn right along the Coach Road (D), until you reach the white house. At the junction by the white house go straight ahead to pass the Police Headquarters (E) on the left. Notice it says it is OK for authorised vehicles and pedestrians to go there.

(4) Turn right (North-West) and walk down the road to Derby Road at Butterley. On your left you will see the site of Butterley Works and the Gatehouse (F). Cross the road with care. Pass the Midland Railway Centre on your left (G).

(5) After crossing beneath the railway bridge, cross the track (with care) and take the marked footpath (East). Walk up the fields (do NOT take the path to the right) with Butterley Grange (G) on your left and railway to the right. Continue ahead on the footpath and continue around Grange Farm and on up the hill (H) towards The Hayes Conference Centre. (2)

Passing the Conference Centre on your left you come back to Hilltop Mink Farm. Cross back over the stile on your left and turn right to return down the track to the entrance of Hayes Conference Centre and back to St Andrew's Church in Swanwick village. (D/A)

Waypoints :
D/A : km 0 - alt. 140m - St Andrew's Church in Swanwick village
1 : km 0.61 - alt. 115m - Hayes Conference Centre
2 : km 0.98 - alt. 134m - Sign to Golden Valley
3 : km 2.51 - alt. 118m - Toll Bar cottages
4 : km 3.41 - alt. 126m - Derby Road
5 : km 4.15 - alt. 108m - Midland Railway Centre
D/A : km 6.46 - alt. 140m - St Andrew's Church in Swanwick village

Useful Information

Care is needed when crossing roads. Undulating country walk, footpaths, roads, lanes, and stiles. Can be muddy.
Car Park : Free car park across the road from St Andrew's Church.
Start: Andrew's Church, Derby Road, Swanwick.
OS ref. map Explorer 269-403 532.

More information at https://pentrichrevolution.org.uk/groupf...

Visorando and this author cannot be held responsible in the case of accidents or problems occuring on this walk.

During the walk or to do/see around

(A) In 1817 Swanwick was a village of miners or stocking framework knitters who faced poverty and hunger. Reputed to be a centre of Luddite activity, there was much support for reform of Parliament called for by the Hampden Club, meeting at the Queen's Head in Alfreton. We follow the route taken by men from Swanwick and Alfreton as they marched towards Codnor. They included ‘secret committee’ men, Edward Haslam and James Barnes, who marched at the rear with his gun, William Elliott and George Rawson who had brought bullets they had cast, and Laban Taylor at whose home Jeremiah Brandreth had stayed on 6th June.

(B) Swanwick Station. On your right you see the former Brittain Pit, a colliery opened by the Butterley Company in 1827 and closed in 1946.

(C) This area is Butterley Park. The rebels came this way visiting houses and farms to take men and weapons. The home of Harriet Marriot was visited and a gun taken. The rebels marched on from here to reach Codnor where the main rebel party waited.

(D) Below you is the tunnel of the Cromford Canal. From the now blocked tunnel in Golden Valley, it continued under Butterley Park for 2,996 yards. It is the only tunnel of its kind in the world with an underground wharf, which served the Butterley works. This magnificent feat of engineering was built by the engineer William Jessop in 1794. See the remains of the two airshafts, each surrounded by an earth mound and trees on the right of the road.
Cavalry from the Chesterfield Troop of Yeomanry and pikemen waited here on 10th June to capture fleeing insurgents. Several hid in the Swanwick Woods but were captured and joined 28 others who were taken to Derby Gaol that night.

(E) Butterley Hall, built in 1790, now within the Police HQ, was the home of Benjamin Outram, founder of the Butterley Iron works.

(F) The main body of marchers stopped here and demanded guns. The manager, George Goodwin, and a few special constables refused to open the gates. Too weak to attack the Gatehouse the rebels left empty handed and marched on towards Codnor. Goodwin knew some of the men, who previously worked at Butterley, and gave evidence of their ‘character’ at the Derby Trials. See the plaque on the old Gatehouse of the works.

(G) In 1817 Butterley Grange was the home of John Wright, a partner of Outram and Jessop at the iron works. The Hayes built in 1860, now a conference centre, was a POW camp for German officers in WW2, made famous by the film of the one successful escape by a German officer.

(H) The march proved a tragedy for local men fleeing before soldiers at Gilt Brook. Three from Swanwick and Alfreton were tried in Derby. German Buxton (31) miner, married with a daughter, originally from Wessington was transported for life. Thomas Bettison (35) miner, transported for 14 years as was Joseph Rawson (32) framework knitter. Among those arrested and imprisoned but later released were Anthony Elliott, John Hall and James Robinson.

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