The Brecon Beacons Way from Llangadog Station to Abergavenny Station

This is the Beacons Way "the other way" from West to East. The prevailing wind comes from the west, so I prefer to have it at my back than in my face. However, there are a lot of North-South headings along this route and even an occasional westerly path. The scenery is fantastic either looking forward, back or to the side. A route to be enjoyed either way.

Technical sheet
No. 3063879
A Carmarthenshire walk posted on 09/03/20 by El Sud. Update : 31/03/20
Author's time Author's time : 8 days
Distance Distance : 182.22km
Vertical gain Vertical gain : 6357m
Vertical drop Vertical drop : 6331m
Highest point Highest point : 856m
Lowest point Lowest point : 42m
Average Difficulty : Average
Back to starting point Back to starting point : No
Walking Walking
Area Area : Brecon Beacons
Location Location : Carmarthenshire
Starting point Starting point : N 51.940258° / W 3.893004°
Arrival Arrival : N 51.817138° / W 3.008983°

Step by step walk

CThis walk needs several days, please find the details below.

Day 1 of the Brecon Beacons Way - Llangadog Station to Carreg Cennen Castle

This is a short walk to begin the Brecon Beacons Way, going from west to east. You might need a few hours to get to Llangdog Station at the start of the walk or you might choose to stay in the village before setting out on the trail. Either way, this route is an easy way to break into your stride without any strain or stress.

Day 2 of the Brecon Beacons Way - Carreg Cennen Castle to YHA Llanddeusant

This walk takes us north from Carreg Cennen Castle, into the Black Mountains on the second leg of the Brecon Beacons Way. There are a couple of climbs but nothing too difficult and there's plenty to see along the way.

Day 3 of the Brecon Beacons Way - YHA Llanddeusant to Craig-y-Nos

The route leaves Llanddeusant and heads into the Black Mountains on the third leg of the Brecon Beacons Way. It's generally a walk south along ridges and mountain tops to finally drop down to the Craig-y-nos Country Park on the Afon Tawe river.

Day 4 of the Brecon Beacons Way - Craig-y-Nos to YHA Brecon Beacons

We're now well into the Brecon Beacons Way and this route begins with a walk through the Ogof Ffynnon Ddu National Nature Reserve, designated to protect its limestone pavements, associated flora and caves beneath. Then it heads north to climb up to Fan Llia and follow the crags over to Storey Arms. It then takes the Taff Trail to YHA Brecon Beacons.

Day 5 of the Brecon Beacons Way - YHA Brecon Beacons to YHA Danywenallt

The route continues on the west-to-east Brecon Beacons Way, now over halfway to its final destination at Abergavenny Station. This is possibly the most strenuous day's walking as there are a number of climbs, starting with Corn Du and Pen y Fan. However, on a clear day, the views are spectacular.

Day 6 of the Brecon Beacons Way - YHA Danywenallt to YHA Llangattock

The route goes from YHA to YHA but essentially follows the Brecon Beacons Way going west-to-east. This section goes through a Site of Special Scientific Interest as it passes Llangorse Lake (Lyn Syfaddan). Formed in the Ice Age, it is one of the few naturally eutrophic lakes in Wales and is of national if not international importance.

Day 7 of the Brecon Beacons Way - YHA Llangattock to Llantony

This route takes us across the River Usk and through Crickhowell, up Table Mountain to visit Crug Hywel (fort), over the Grwyne Fechan valley, up to Crug Mawr and down into Grwyne Fawr valley. It passes Partrishow Church, parts of which date from before 1065. Then it's a climb up Garn Wen and Bâl Bach before dropping down to Llantony and the Prior.

Day 8 of the Brecon Beacons Way - Llantony to Abergavenny Station

The route goes south from Llantony Priory over Hatterall Hill, where it joins the Offa’s Dyke for 4.5km, down to the village of Llanvihangel Crucorney, which has an inn that dates back to the 11th century and up The Skirrid (also known as Holy Mountain), which rises to 486m. Finally, the route finds its way into Abergavenny and terminates at the station.

Useful Information

There are a number of villages and farms along the way, apart from the high Brecon Beacons where the route is exposed and should be accounted for by wearing and carrying the right gear. Strong boots that protect the ankles are always recommendable but should, above all, be comfortable and "worn in". Accommodation is patchy with this route taking advantage of the YHA locations even if it means adding on a few more miles at the beginning and at the end of the day. Otherwise, the best policy is to book a taxi to take you to a B&B or elsewhere. There are probably places to wild camp or even official campsites but that means carrying extra gear and my preference is to travel light with a day pack containing a couple of changes of clothing and washing stuff along the way (YHA drying rooms are great for this).

Visorando and this author cannot be held responsible in the case of accidents or problems occuring on this walk.

During the walk or to do/see around

The route is peppered with historical sites. The high ground is where the best views are but in the valleys and hamlets is where the human element is plain to see. This area has been populated for thousands of years and the moulding of the landscape is a testimony to those who went before us and also to those still protecting and working the land. Some of the more popular climbs will be shared with others that are looking for the freedom of the fells. In the quieter spots, there should always be time for a chat with a local farmer or shopkeeper. Don't be afraid to ask for directions. There are some tricky navigational areas, not only on the high ground but also in the often confusing villages and towns. As the majority of people who do the Beacons Way go from East to West, the chances are you will cross other ramblers and can check directions as an opportunity to start a conversation. Nature is wonderful but people can be quite surprising and entertaining.

Other walks in the area

distance 15.83km Vertical gain +420m Vertical drop -231m Durée 5h45 Average Average
Starting point Starting point in Carmarthenshire

This is a short walk to begin the Brecon Beacons Way, going from west to east. You might need a few hours to get to Llangdog Station at the start of the walk or you might choose to stay in the village before setting out on the trail. Either way, this route is an easy way to break into your stride without any strain or stress.

distance 16.03km Vertical gain +675m Vertical drop -741m Durée 6h30 Average Average
Starting point Starting point in Carmarthenshire

The route leaves Llanddeusant and heads into the Black Mountains on the third leg of the Brecon Beacons Way. It's generally a walk south along ridges and mountain tops to finally drop down to the Craig-y-nos Country Park on the Afon Tawe river.

distance 17.99km Vertical gain +652m Vertical drop -685m Durée 7h00 Difficult Difficult
Starting point Starting point in Llanddeusant - Carmarthenshire

This is a brilliant linear trail in the Brecon Beacons National Park, incorporating many good viewpoints and one extra-special one. It begins in Carmarthenshire near the village of Llandeusant and ends in Powys in the Glyntawe valley, crossing a mountain ridge that beats Pen-y-Fan in my view, but because it's less accessible is less well-known.

distance 20.21km Vertical gain +647m Vertical drop -619m Durée 7h35 Average Average
Starting point Starting point in Carmarthenshire

This walk takes us north from Carreg Cennen Castle, into the Black Mountains on the second leg of the Brecon Beacons Way. There are a couple of climbs but nothing too difficult and there's plenty to see along the way.

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The GPS track and description are the property of the author.