Duncarnock Fort (The Craigie) from Neilston

Duncarnock Fort (known locally as The Craigie) is a craggy hill (204 m / 669 ft) which stands invitingly on the banks of Glanderston Dam. Pausing on the summit of what was formerly an iron age fort, take a moment to wonder about it’s history and all that may have happened here many years ago! On a clear day, just as Mary Queen of Scots is rumoured to have done, you will enjoy panoramic views over greater Glasgow extending to the Campsies in the north.

Technical sheet
No. 22087044
A East Renfrewshire walk posted on 19/05/22 by Gillian's Walks. Update : 20/05/22
Calculated time Calculated time: 2h30[?]
Distance Distance : 7.78km
Vertical gain Vertical gain : 84m
Vertical drop Vertical drop : 87m
Highest point Highest point : 189m
Lowest point Lowest point : 118m
Easy Difficulty : Easy
Back to starting point Back to starting point : Yes
Walking Walking
Location Location : East Renfrewshire
Starting point Starting point : N 55.783192° / W 4.42673°
Download : -
Glanderston Dam and The Craigie

Description

(D/A) Head East out of Neilston Train Station towards Kingston Road / High Street.

Turn right (South) onto Kingston Road / High Street and take the second street on the left - Kirkton Road. Continue along this quiet single-track road through peaceful countryside for 1.5km. The road bears left past Loanfoot Farm then passes a few cottages to reach the junction with Springhill Road.

(1) Cross Springhill Road, go through a gate into a field.

(2) At first there is a track but after less than 100m this wears out and there is no obvious path to show the way (despite their being one shown on the map). You are aiming to get to a gate at the bottom of the field, where the areas of woodland on your left and right meet together. Go through or climb the gate (sometimes locked).

(3) Descend East to a fisherman’s bothy beside Glanderston Dam. You will be able to see The Craigie ahead.

(4) Turn left (North East) and walk along the edge of the Dam. After 100m, and before reaching the road, go through a gate on your right which gives you access to a grass embankment beside the dam.

Walk to the end of the embankment then cross a footbridge over Aurs Burn. At the other side follow a path South East to walk alongside a row of trees, keeping them on your right-hand side.

(5) After the last tree you will see a wooden stile at a wall ahead of you. Cross the stile and turn left (East) to follow a vague path around the base of The Craigie.

(6) As the path begins to climb turn right at a fork and ascend the steep slope to reach the summit.

Descend via the same route and retrace your steps back to the gate at the north end of the grassy embankment (4).

Go through the gate and turn right (East) to emerge onto a minor road. Turn left (North West) to reach Glanderston Road. Continue ahead (North West) on Glanderston Road for 450m until it meets with Springhill Road.

Turn right (North) and continue along Springhill Road for approx 700m to just beyond the bridge over the railway line.

(7) Turn left (North West) along a road parallel to the railway line (not shown on map) for 200m to meet up again with Springhill Road.

Continue ahead for 1.3km during which time Springfield Road becomes Sykes Terrace then Hamilton Place before arriving at a roundabout.

(8) Turn right (North West) at the roundabout onto Kirktonfield Road.

At the road end turn left (South West) onto Main Street and continue for 180m to a crossroads at Neilston Parish Church. Turn left (South East) onto High Street and you will reach Neilston Train Station after 270m (D/A)

Waypoints :
D/A : km 0 - alt. 141m - Neilston Train Station (G78 3DY)
1 : km 1.8 - alt. 176m - Gate leading to field
2 : km 2.23 - alt. 172m - Gate where the two woodlands meet
3 : km 2.38 - alt. 150m - Fisherman's bothy
4 : km 2.59 - alt. 145m - Gate giving access to grassy embankment
5 : km 2.97 - alt. 156m - Stile
6 : km 3.3 - alt. 178m - Duncarnock Fort / The Craigie summit
7 : km 5.33 - alt. 121m - Road parallel to railway line (not on map)
8 : km 6.86 - alt. 122m - Roundabout
D/A : km 7.78 - alt. 141m - Neilston Train Station (G78 3DY)

Useful Information

For more information and a walk review visit Gillian's Walks

Transport
By train: Neilston train station is located at the start of this walk
By car: car parking available at Neilston train station
By bus: local bus services stop close to the walk start point

Terrain
Mostly surfaced country roads which do see some traffic, as well as some muddy field and hill paths. Several gates (one of which is sometimes locked so needs climbed) and a stile.

Visorando and this author cannot be held responsible in the case of accidents or problems occuring on this walk.

During the walk or to do/see around

  • Duncarnock Fort / The Craigie - formerly an iron age fort, trig point on top
  • Glanderston Dam
  • Dams to Darnley Country Park is close by

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The GPS track and description are the property of the author.