Glenarm to Linford - Antrim Hills Way

This walk is part of the trek Antrim Hills Way.

For this 1rst section of the Antrim Hills Way, enjoy fine views open out to Slemish as you reach Black Hill and some coastal views improve as you progress afterward, with the hills of Scotland and the rocky outcrops of the Maidens, or Hulin Rocks, all clearly visible out to sea

Technical sheet
No. 29801846
A Larne walk posted on 09/01/23 by Walk NI. Update : 12/01/23
Calculated time Calculated time: 4h15[?]
Distance Distance : 10.86 km
Vertical gain Vertical gain : 414 m
Vertical drop Vertical drop : 145 m
Highest point Highest point : 377 m
Lowest point Lowest point : 5 m
Moderate Difficulty : Moderate
Back to starting point Back to starting point : No
Walking Walking
Location Location : Larne
Starting point Starting point : N 54.969018° / W 5.955654°
Ending point Ending point : N 54.89564° / W 5.922906°
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Download : PDF / Print - GPX track

Description

Start : Glenarm’s Coast Road car park, The Cloney, Glenarm, Ballymena (BT44 0AB). Grid Ref. : NW 469 709

(D) From the information panel in Glenarm’s Coast Road car park, head left (South-East) past St Patrick’s Church. (A) Cross the bridge.

(1) At the roundabout, turn right (South) into Toberwine Street (B). This widens into Altmore Street which has rows of stately Georgian houses. A stone archway at the end is the entrance into Glenarm Forest Park.

(2) At the park entrance, the road veers left onto Town Brae Road. Climb steeply along the tarmac to reach a T-junction after 1km.

(3) Turn right and continue your ascent, which is more gentle now. The increasingly expansive coastal views will provide compensation of the effort of the climb.

(4) After another kilometre, a sign indicates the start of the off-road mountain section. Cross a stile and follow a track up the left-hand side of a field, passing between several thickets of gorse.

(5) The ground flattens at the top of the field and fine views open out to Slemish. As you pass over the brow of a hill, the day's first summit comes into sight ahead. Standing atop a ridge to the South-East, you should just be able to make out a pillar on the skyline, marking the top of Black Hill. To reach the summit, first follow the posts across rough grassland, then veer left and climb across the peaty hillside. (C)

(6) The route swings East at the summit of Black Hill, crossing rough, heather-covered ground towards the edge of the plateau. The coastal views improve as you progress, with the hills of Scotland and the rocky outcrops of the Maidens, or Hulin Rocks, all clearly visible out to sea. It’s an expansive panorama, and one that stays with you for the duration of the day.

The terrain becomes easier underfoot as you head South along the plateau's Eastern edge. Keep to the high ground and cross a series of grassy undulations to arrive at the 378m summit of Scawt Hill.

(7) A gradual descent and ascent then brings you to the top of Ballycoos (361m). (D)

(8) From here, descend easily across cropped grass to reach the road and car park at Linford. (A)

Waypoints :
D : km 0 - alt. 5 m - Glenarm’s Coast Road car park
1 : km 0.26 - alt. 5 m - Roundabout - Toberwine Street
2 : km 0.58 - alt. 16 m - Glenarm Forest Park
3 : km 1.55 - alt. 120 m - T-junction
4 : km 3.42 - alt. 220 m - Start of the mountain section
5 : km 4.04 - alt. 280 m - Ground flattens
6 : km 6.01 - alt. 376 m - Black Hill
7 : km 8.49 - alt. 361 m - Scawt Hill - Scawt Hill
8 : km 9.28 - alt. 358 m - Ballycoos
A : km 10.86 - alt. 273 m - Car park Linford

Useful Information

Start : Glenarm’s Coast Road car park, The Cloney, Glenarm, Ballymena (BT44 0AB). Grid Ref. : NW 469 709

Parking : Glenarm’s Coast Road car park at the departure and Linford car park at the arrival. (BT44 0AB). Grid Ref. : NW 469 709

Public transport : Translink Journey Planner

Terrain : Please be aware that this walking route passes through areas of open land such as hillside, working farmland and working forests. Livestock and bulls can be present at certain times of the year, ground conditions may be uneven or wet underfoot and all forestry signage should be adhered to.

Facilities : Toilets, Visitors Centre, Shop are at Glenarm.

Note : Dogs are strictly not allowed, even when on a lead. Cattle can feel threatened by dogs.
The route is in place through permission of landowners. It is mostly off-road through fields which are usually grazed by sheep or cows. For safety reasons dogs are not allowed even if on a lead. Bulls can be present at certain times of the year. Hills are exposed and mostly covered in heather or tussocky grasses. Good footwear and advance preparation are strongly advised.

Find more information and walk ideas at Walk NI here.

Visorando and this author cannot be held responsible in the case of accidents or problems occuring on this walk.

During the walk or to do/see around

Spectacular views of Slemish and the coastline.

History of Glenarm : The village of Glenarm was established around the time of the Normans. In the twelfth century it was granted a royal decree by King John, making it the oldest chartered village in Ulster. Modern visitors can still explore the 800-acre forest park that once formed part of Glenarm Castle estate.

(A) St Patrick’s Church : This attractive, eighteenth-century building is the oldest Gothic-style church in Ireland.

(B) Toberwine Street : This widens into Altmore Street, with its rows of stately Georgian houses and a stone archway that allows entry to Glenarm Forest Park.

(C) Black Hill : The 381m-high trig pillar makes a great vantage point, with the outlines of the Belfast Hills, the Mourne Mountains and the Sperrins decorating the horizon all around. It’s a wonderful view and a good spot for a break, as you relax in the knowledge that the most significant climb of the day is now behind you. The coastal views improve as you progress, with the hills of Scotland and the rocky outcrops of the Maidens, or Hulin Rocks, all clearly visible out to sea. It’s an expansive panorama, and one that stays with you for the duration of the day.

(D) Top of Ballycoos : It’s worth pausing for a moment to examine the two prominent mounds near Linford car park, which are thought to be Neolithic burial sites dating from around 4000 BC.

Other walks in the area

Tourist office
distance 36.76 km Vertical gain +973 m Vertical drop -721 m Durée 3 days Difficult Difficult
Starting point Starting point in Larne

Featuring expansive panoramas and challenging climbs, this walk traverses cliffs, moorland and country tracks before leading to Slemish Mountain. Crossing some of the most scenic upland areas in the Antrim Glens, this walk provides uninterrupted views over many miles of Northern Ireland. Mountain walkers will love the challenge of the steep climbs to an exposed landscape, negotiating ground cover of heather, tussocky grasses and reeds and jumping over streams and damp bogs.

Tourist office
distance 15.33 km Vertical gain +298 m Vertical drop -362 m Durée 5h15 Difficult Difficult
Starting point Starting point in Larne

For this 2nd section of the Antrim Hills Way, enjoy views of cliffs of Agnew’s Hill and long views open out along the Glenwherry Valley, with the windfarm at the top of Elliot’s Hill before going past Donaghy's Bridge and reach Greenmount Hill Farm & Agricultural College. For safety reasons dogs are not allowed even if on a lead.

Tourist office
distance 10.57 km Vertical gain +261 m Vertical drop -214 m Durée 3h45 Moderate Moderate
Starting point Starting point in Ballymena

This final section of the Antrim Hills Way,
For safety reasons dogs are not allowed even if on a lead.

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The GPS track and description are the property of the author.

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